US birthrate plunges to its lowest level since 1920


The US birthrate has plunged to a record low, a development that is attributed to the impact of the country’s economic downturn in past years, especially on immigrant women, a study finds. The US birthrate has plunged to a record low, a development that is attributed to the impact of the country’s economic downturn in past years, especially on immigrant women, a study finds.[/caption]

The US birthrate has plunged to its lowest since 1920, a development that is attributed to the impact of the country’s economic downturn in the past years, a study finds.

According to a study, released Thursday by the Pew Research Center, the overall birthrate in the US declined by eight percent between 2007 and 2010, also indicating a more significant fertility rate drop of 14 percent among immigrant women, The Washington Post reported.

The study also reflects that the overall US birthrate stands at its lowest level since 1920, when reliable statistics on fertility rates were first collected.


Although the rate of 63.2 births per 1,000 childbearing women has plunged to just over half of its peak in 1957, following the nationwide recession that began in 2007, the birthrate for immigrant women fell drastically.

One of the most dramatic drops, according to the report, was among Mexican immigrants, indicating a 23-percent decline.

“The economic downturn seems to play a pretty large role in the drop in the fertility rate,” said D’Vera Cohn, one of the report’s authors who further insists that the decline in American fertility rate did not occur due to a fewer number of immigrant women of childbearing age in the country but because of a change in their behavior.

According to the report, the decreasing fertility rate may have “far-reaching implications” for American economic and social policy. A persisting decline may challenge enduring assumptions that immigrant births will help in maintaining US population levels and replacing the taxpaying workforce required to support the aging baby-boom generation.

Almost half of all immigrants to the United States are of Hispanic origin, the report says. However, in recent years, the flow of immigrants from Mexico, the largest contributing country, has ceased for the first time since the Great Depression. The net migration from Mexico has reportedly been zero.

Meanwhile, the average number of children a US woman is predicted to have in her lifetime is 1.9, slightly less than the 2.1 children required to maintain current population levels.

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